Our Bibbulmun Two Person Gear List (3.1kg/6.8lb each)

Here is the gear we took on the Bibbulmun as a couple. At the end of the post, we discuss what did and didn’t work so well, as well as changes we would make in the future. Our recommended gear list for solo hikers can be found at Bibbulmun Ultralight Solo Gear List.

Total weight in list: 8137g/287.02oz
Worn weight (Maddie): 962g/33.93oz
Worn weight (Tom): 896g/31.61oz
Individual base weight (half total base weight): 3139.5g/110.74oz

Sleeping

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Two person tentZpacks Duplex0.75oz/yd² for durability. Perfect size for us.600/21.16
Twin quiltZpacks OC (30F) Twin Quilt (short)Short/slim design. Only just warm enough (it was a cold season). 0C is a generous rating.530/18.70
Sleeping matExped Synmat HL DUO MSuper comfy and avoids heat loss between mats when using a twin quilt. Not very durable. Experienced a baffle failure during the trip (not the first either).830/29.28
Sleeping mat inflation sack58/2.05
GroundsheetPolycroFor protecting sleeping mat when sleeping in shelters. Cut to size of sleeping mat.40/1.41
Tent stakesEaston Nano 15cm and Shepard's Hook Ti stakes6 Easton Nano at 8g each. 2 Shepard's Hook at 5g each for guy lines.58/2.05
Total2116/74.64

Kitchen

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Water bottles1L Balance bottleCarry 2 each. Nice shape (Smart water equivalent in Australia). Swapped out lids for push pull tops.144/5.08
SpoonToaks titaniumOne short (10g), one long (13g).23/0.81
Scent proof food bagOPSAC 20×12Food bag for reducing scent profile. One each.68/2.40
Rehydration containerGatorade containerOne each. Didn’t like them, they leak. Peanut butter container works better for us.52/1.83
Total287/10.12

First Aid

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Pocket knifeSwiss Army Knife WegnerKnife, scissors, tweezers. Better scissors than classic21/0.74
Snake bandage94/3.32
Blister tapeFixomull4/0.14
Duct/electrical tapeFor repairs and blisters.6/0.21
Repair tapeDCF and tenacious.5/0.18
Antihistaminesx10 for mosquito bites etc.4/0.14
Ibuprofenx10 for pain relief and inflammation.4/0.14
Caffeine tabletNo-Dozx6.3/0.11
Anti-diarrhoea TabletsImmodiumx6.2/0.07
Hikers woolFor blisters.Not much
Safety pinFor blisters.2/0.07
Sewing needle and thread3 needles. For repairs and popping blisters.3/0.11
ToothbrushCut short. One each.4/0.14
SuperglueFor large cuts and repairs.4/0.14
Alcohol padx6 for cuts and mat repair.4/0.14
Mat repair kitExpedFabric and glue repair for big punctures/cuts18/0.63
Glue dotsx6 for small mat repairs.2/0.07
CordZpacks1.3mm.3/0.11
MatchesRedheads (short)1 pack.10/0.35
Menstrual cup20/0.71
Ear plugsSleeping. Two spare sets.Not much
SleepmaskImproves sleep.6/0.21
Comb6/0.21
HairlackiesSpare for tying stuff.4/0.14
Tick ToxFor tick removal.20/0.71
Total249/8.78

Consumables

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
SunscreenIn 30ml tub. Resupply in every town.47/1.66
Lip BalmCarmex Squeeze TubeSPF15 and stops lips/under nose cracking.14/0.49
Water purification tabletsAquatabs80 x 5 L tabs.11/0.39
Anti-chafeGurney GooIn 15g tube.20/0.71
Hand sanitizerIn 30ml tub. Resupply in every town.29/1.02
ToothpasteIn travel tube. Resupply when needed. Would take toothpaste drops next time.10/0.35
Toilet paper13/0.46
Total144/5.08

Electronics

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
PowerbankNITECORENB 10000King of the power banks currently. Two outputs is very useful.150/5.29
PlugHomeKit Australia Dual Port GaN Charger20w, AU plug.45/1.59
iPhone cableGeneric5g each. Carried two for redundancy (USB A and USB C). Short 10cm length.10/0.35
Microusb cableGeneric7g each. Carried two for redundancy (USB A and USB C). For inReach Mini and NU25.14/0.49
USB C cableGenericFor fast charging powerbank.10/0.35
Phone (Tom)iPhone 12 MiniWaterproof case. Good battery life, battery efficiency, screen size and camera.190/6.70
Phone (Maddie)iPhone 13 ProWaterproof case. Good battery life and efficiency, excellent camera with zoom and macro lens.279/9.84
HeadphonesAirpods ProWith case. For listening to music together.55/1.94
Satellite device/safety beaconGarmin inReach MiniFor safety, texting, weather forecast.100/3.53
HeadtorchNU25 headlampOne each. 360 Lm max. Homemade cord headband.66/2.33
Total919/32.42

Clothes carried (Maddie)

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Wind jacketMontbell TachyonAdds heaps of versatility and warmth. One of my favourite items. For sleeping if everything else is soaked.41/1.45
Wind pantsMontbell UL Stretch Wind PantsAdds heaps of versatility and warmth. Sleep in every night.70/2.47
Rain jacketGore R7 ShakedryGreat jacket. Shakedry works really well and glad it has two zip pockets. Not super durable but held up well. It has one hole but from a barbed wire fence.121/4.27
Rain pantsMontbell VersaliteFor warmth in wet weather. Not super durable but good enough. Water seeps through eventually.104/3.67
FleeceMacpac Nitro Polartec AlphaOlder 60g/m² version. Great active layer.107/3.77
Down jacketBorah Gear62.5g of (2.3oz) down.146/5.15
BuffOutdoor Research Echo UbertubeVery thin and breathable. Keep ears warm under hat walking and sleeping.20/0.71
Fleece glovesDecathlon fleece glovesOnly just warm enough (it was a cold season). Would take possum gloves next time.20/0.71
Rain glovesMLD eVent Rain MittsFor warmth when wet. Not very durable and leaked (were second hand so unsure of prior use). Hard to seam seal properly.41/1.45
Spare undiesExOfficio Bikini Briefs23/0.81
Spare socksIcebreaker Lifestyle39/1.38
Total732/25.82

Clothes carried (Tom)

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Wind jacketMontbell TachyonAdds heaps of versatility and warmth. One of my favourite items. For sleeping if everything else is soaked.46/1.62
Wind pantsMontbell UL Stretch Wind PantsAdds heaps of versatility and warmth. Sleep in every night.70/2.47
Rain jacketKathmandu Zeolite ShakedryDurable shakedry jacket but the pocket is annoying (it is inside and inaccessible).190/6.70
Rain pantsZpacks Rain PantsOld DCF model. For warmth in wet weather but DCF doesn’t pack very small. Have found them more durable than Montbell Versalite.100/3.53
FleeceMacpac Nitro Polartec AlphaOlder 60g/m² version. Great active layer.140/4.94
Down jacketMontbell Plasma 100045g (1.6oz) of down. More of a down shirt than a jacket. Adds a bit of warmth but not heaps.126/4.44
TightsNike ProPrevents chaffing.75/2.65
BuffOutdoor Research Echo UbertubeVery thin and breathable. Keep ears warm under hat walking and sleeping.20/0.71
Fleece glovesDecathlon fleece glovesOnly just warm enough (it was a cold season). Would take possum gloves next time.20/0.71
Rain glovesBorah Gear eVent mittsFor warmth when wet. Not fully waterproof as seam sealing isn’t perfect. More durable than MLD eVent Rain Mitts and work ok.34/1.20
Spare undiesExOfficio Briefs30/1.06
Spare socksIcebreaker Lifestyle39/1.38
Total890/31.39

Miscellaneous

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Hiking packSuperior Wilderness Design 38L DCF pack with mesh hip belt420g each. More than enough space for longest food carry. Super nice.840/29.63
Water bottle holderJustin’sUL2 x 1L bottle holders for shoulder straps on each pack. Mesh not super durable but otherwise fantastic product.54/1.90
Dry bagZpacks DCF Large Food Bag (14L), Sea to Summit silnylon (8L)Zpacks 14L for quilt and sleep clothes. Sea to Summit 8L for day clothes.37/1.31
Zip lock bagsFor compartmentalising and keeping things dry.1/0.04
Debit cards10/0.35
Total942/33.23

Clothes worn (Maddie)

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Long sleeve shirtOutdoor Research EchoGood collar. Zip for ventilation. Super breathable. Thumb holes.104/3.67
Running shorts2XU 5 inch Men’s running shortsGood length for sun protection. I like the men’s shorts because they have a zip pocket.100/3.53
Sports braNike111/3.92
UnderwearExofficio Bikini briefs31/1.09
HatOutdoor Research Sun RunnerStylish. Also use cape as towel for drying things.80/2.82
Trekking polesHelinox FL120120cm. A bit too short for setting up the Duplex. Alloy so won’t snap but have bent one once.145/5.11
SunglassesJulbo Shield MCat 2-4 photochromic sunglasses. Love them.27/0.95
SocksIcebreaker lifestyleThin merino socks.44/1.55
Running shoesNike Pegasus 36 TrailBring them back!255/8.99
GaitersDirty girl gatersGreat for keeping dirt and stones out of your shoes. Increases lifetime of socks.40/1.41
WatchCasio W-202Simple and good back light. Alarm isn’t loud enough though and no vibration.25/0.88
Total962/33.93

Clothes worn (Tom)

ItemProductNotesWeight (g/oz)
Long sleeve shirtOutdoor Research Echo Long SleeveGood collar. Zip for ventilation. Super breathable. Thumb holes.107/3.77
Running shortsNike Trail ShortsFavorite shorts. Three zipped pockets.127/4.48
UnderwearExOfficio Briefs31/1.09
HatOutdoor Research Sun RunnerStylish. Also use cape as towel for drying things.80/2.82
Trekking polesNaturehike ST10 Ultralight Telescopic Poles130cm. Carbon. Telescopic. Flip lock. Super light. Carbon is strong, but I have broken the straps.155/5.47
SunglassesJulbo TrekCat 2-4 photochromic sunglasses. Nice but would be better if they went darker. Had to replace lens that fell out.32/1.13
SocksIcebreaker LifestyleThin merino socks.44/1.55
Running shoesNike Pegasus 36 TrailBring them back!255/8.99
GaitersDirty Girl GaitersGreat for keeping dirt and stones out of your shoes. Increases lifetime of socks.40/1.41
WatchCasio W-202Simple and good back light. Alarm isn’t loud enough though and no vibration.25/0.88
Total896/31.61

Gear analysis

Overall we were happy with our gear choices for the Bibbulmun, but would make some changes should we walk the track in the future.

What worked well

Real winners for this trip were our Goretex Shakedry rain jackets. We really do think they live up to the hype and keep you noticeably dryer and cooler for much longer than the slew of rain jackets we have used previously. For us, one of the biggest problems with Shakedry jackets is the cost. We were fortunate find some good deals online, as we were unwilling to spend $300-500 on a rain jacket. Additionally it can be hard to find a Shakedry jacket with pockets, something that we find very useful. Most companies producing ~100-120g jackets do not include pockets. Maddie was lucky to grab a Gore R7 ladies jacket which has two zip pockets (oddly the male has only a single chest pocket). Tom picked up a Zeolite, which was his first bit of Kathmandu gear purchased in a long time! The Zeolite is much heavier (190g after some cutting vs 121g) and has an odd pocket inside the jacket at the bottom which is quite difficult to operate. The Zeolite is made of the tougher ‘hiking approved’ Shakedry and definitely feels sturdier. However, if given the choice, Tom would have taken a Gore R7 as Maddie’s R7 has proven durable enough for on trail hiking.

We were glad we permethrin soaked our clothes as we feel we got fewer ticks and experienced significantly lower bug pressure than others around us. We weren’t sure what to take as an ultralight method to safely remove ticks and ended up taking Tick Tox spray (20g). It takes up a decent amount of room and doesn’t feel ultralight but we wanted a method of being able to remove ticks without the risk of them injecting nasties into you. If you have a better suggestion let us know!

This was also the first long hike where we completely ditched hiking pants and went for the wind pants + rain pants combo (total 150g). We slept in the wind pants and used them for warmth and bug protection in the day. If it was raining, we would opt to wear our rain pants, leaving our wind pants in our packs so they would stay dry for sleeping in later than night. We were frankly very surprised at how well this system worked and solved the problem for us of carrying heavy hiking pants (200g+), only to use them for sleeping at night and bug protection. Unless we are doing a walk with lots of scrub and off track, we don’t plan on carrying hiking pants any time soon.

What didn't work well

Since our spring was colder than average we would have been more comfortable with a warmer quilt. Our Zpacks twin quilt is rated as 0C/30F but in our opinion is more like 5C/40F. We also would have preferred 90g/m2 Polartech Alpha fleeces compared to our 60g/m2 ones for staying warmer in cold driving rain. Furthermore, Tom decided that the Montbell Plasma 1000 down jacket was not very useful. At 130g it does provide more warmth than a comparable fleece. However, for only 30-50g more you get a whole lot more down jacket and will be super toasty rather than just warm enough.

We found that our eVent rain mitts didn’t work very well, something we already knew from 3 months in South America but seemed to have forgotten. The problem is that our models (MLD and Borah Gear) require seam sealing at home. This task sounds simple enough but from experience we just don’t think seam sealing mitts works very well. In our opinion, they need to be seam taped. We would be keen to try the Zpacks rain mitts to see if that makes a difference. A few months after finishing the Bibbulmun, Tom used disposable plastic food handling gloves on the AAWT FKT and they worked much better.

On top of having issues with our rain mitts, we continued our trend of having issues with inflatable mats. Our Exped Synmat HL Duo LW had two baffles blow out. This is the second time we have had an Exped baffle blow and the fourth in total including our NeoAir mats. After roughly 4 months of use, we have concluded that the fabrics used on the Exped HL Duo LW are not durable enough for our liking, as we have had to patch these mats several times and the fabric feels very fragile. This is disappointing for us because the two person Exped mat is incredibly comfy and we sleep better on it than any other mat combo. It eliminates the draft issue between two single person mats which is important when using a twin quilt. However, it’s heavier than two single person NeoAir Xlite mats, less warm, less durable, bulkier, and is more annoying to inflate with the pump sack vs blowing up by mouth. We would be very keen to try out a two person NeoAir Xlite! From these experiences, we think we will give foam mats more of a go in 3 season conditions.

Going stoveless for the first time

On this hike we also decided to try no cook. This meant instead of taking a pot and stove we took containers to rehydrate cold food. For us, this was not so much about saving weight (it only saves about 100g per person), but more about simplicity. On our last long trip, 3 months in South America, we grew tired of cooking meals at the end of each day, and the associated cleaning and managing/acquiring fuel. One of the things we love about hiking is simplicity and no stove means one less thing to do. Maddie was the driving force behind trying no cook. Tom was open to the idea, but was pretty sure ‘no cook would be no good’.

Our first week of going stoveless was pretty miserable as we figured out what did and didn’t work. However, once we figured out some tasty meals we both were extremely surprised how much we enjoyed going stoveless. We definitely plan on going stoveless in 3 season conditions for the foreseeable future. The only exception would be on trips to less developed countries where good stoveless food options aren’t always as readily available. For example, on the Greater Patagonia Trail we pretty much lived on pasta as it was one of the only foods we could purchase in remote villages.

We also wouldn’t go stoveless on short and more social hikes. Stopping, cooking and sharing a meal is one of the best parts of hiking with other people and we wouldn’t want to give that up. No cook is appealing to us on long hikes where simplicity is a much stronger driving factor and we find our standards are a lot lower! We are in the process of doing a more detailed no cook post.

If there is some part of our gear choices you are unsure about, or wonder why we chose X instead of Y, drop us an email! The Bibbulmun is a great track to test out ultralight gear as the risks are relatively low. Towns are frequent, temperatures are mild, you expect to see people every day, and the track quality is very high.

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5 thoughts on “Our Bibbulmun Two Person Gear List (3.1kg/6.8lb each)”

  1. Georgena Leighton

    Thankyou this is so comprehensive.
    Might have missed it but what time of the year did you hike.
    I would be hiking alone my main worry is getting water but you mention towns frequent. What guide book would you recommend??
    Did you find there was always room in a shelter??
    Thanks for sharing you story

    1. Thanks for the questions. Water can certainly be tricky. Your best bet is to consult the Chapman guide book and the AAWT Facebook page for recent water updates. I have walked the trail in November and also January. January can be problematic depending on the year.

      As for the huts, I’ve never come across one that was full.

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